Cafe Primrose

Scandinavian Salmiakki

Posted on March 19, 2013

Salmiakki Candy is a Scandinavian Delicacy.

Salmiakki Candy is a Scandinavian Delicacy.

Well folks, my Scandi friends said it was impossible. They said….. It could not be done. They laughed at me when I told them I was going to do it…. And to their credit, it was much harder than I thought it would be… When I first started work on this project, they told me to just give up. I suppose I would have listened to them… Except that obstinant defiance comes far too naturally to me, if it didn’t I would still be illiterate because some expert along the way said my dyslexia was too severe for me to ever learn to read. I would have laid down and died at 5 in a hospital bed from the internal injuries, shattered pelvis and head trauma after a car accident. I am still standing, I am still publishing this blog even though I was supposed to not survive the night at 5 and even though I was supposed to be eternally illiterate. So when my Scandi buddies told me to just give it up…. I smiled at them….. Then……… I did what they said was impossible. I cooked Salmiakki up in my kitchen! I even photographed the process as proof that it can be done.My homemade Salmiakki has even gotten approved by my husband as being and tasting like the stuff he grew up on in Scandinavia. Let that be a lesson to you all…. Don’t tell me what can and can’t be done. It never ends well for the nay sayers.

Salmiakki cooking on the stove

Salmiakki cooking on the stove

Salmiakki candy is a well cherished and loved Scandinavian candy. It is a salty liquorice candy. Something you don’t find outside of Scandinavia unless you are in the Netherlands. It is unobtainable in this country and in most of the world. I am the only one I know of who has ever produced it in the kitchen. Traditionally, it is diamond shaped and black, but I am not big on fake colorants and I don’t have a mold so I am just making free pour discs of it. It is hard, but when the heat from the mouth hits it it can become slowly almost gummy. My husband loves this candy. It is one of the prides of Finland. They make icecream in this flavor, they add it to their vodka……. etc…

Salmiakki discs hardening on the counter.

Salmiakki discs hardening on the counter.

Salmiakki comes, not just to be used in many edible mediums like icecream, candy, and alcoholic beverages, it comes in many forms of candy. It varies hugely. You can get it in all different consistencies.

Beautiful for a rustic wedding

Beautiful for a rustic wedding

Salmiakki, found it’s beginning as a component (ammonium chloride) in lozenges for coughs in the region of Scandinavia roughly a hundred plus years ago. It was in the 1930s that the candy as we know it today was first produced in Sweden and Norway and Finland.

Rustic and natural Salmiakki

Rustic and natural Salmiakki

I make my Salmiakki with a couple different varieties of cooking salt, and I stay away from the corn syrup that goes into the mass produced Scandinavian candies. I did not just settle with reproducing this amazing world flavor in my kitchen. I did it with as little pollution to the bodies of those that consume this substance as is possible. I have not only met the challenge I set myself to produce Salmiakki in my kitchen, I have surpassed it and created a healthier version.

I package them in a sweet little white baggy and wax paper.

I package them in a sweet little white baggy and wax paper.

These candies are great for a country wedding or a rustic wedding as a highly unusual and unique wedding favor. They would also work great for a baby shower. They have a very rustic old fashioned feel, wrapped in wax paper similarly to Salt Water Toffee.

Great as a favor for a rustic wedding or event.

Great as a favor for a rustic wedding or event.

Unlike a lot of liquorice candy available today, mine, is not just vegan and all natural and organic, it is also real. It is truly made from liquorice powder. You don’t find true candy like this anymore… And you certainly don’t find this unusual and special flavor outside Scandinavia. Taste the world, these are available on my Etsy page.

 

 

 

 

10 comments so far, have your say too!

  1. Martin

    Hi, do you have a recipe?

  2. A good magician in the kitchen never reveals her secrets. 😉

    I will give you some hints though, Invert syrup (or if you like, corn syrup instead.) Anise extract,2 different kinds of salt, one of them table salt…. The other I will let you try to guess. and if you are like me and you like liccorice to be real, add licorice root powder. Then if you want it black add your food coloring… This involves some boiling on the stove at certain temperatures you will need a candy thermometer…. And if you wish to try it, it is in my Etsy shop. Otherwise, you can use these hint to try to do what took me months to replicate Finnish Salmiakki in the kitchen, it isn’t as easy as it looks and there is a process. And already you have a great deal more to work with than I had when I began the project! Good luck, and let me know how it goes.

  3. Peter

    Cool history and fun that the receipt was to you’r husband like!
    Greetings from Sweden

    • hej Peter, tak! :) and greetings from the USA (where we are presently living.)
      You would be on pretty close terms with Salmiakki in Sweden yourself wouldn’t you. But I think you call it something slightly different??? It has been too many years since I last saw Stockholm……….. So I no longer remember. :)

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